Brussels helps Luxembourg feed the poorest

Food aid

Luxembourg is one of the wealthiest countries in the world, but the European Commission will provide € 390,000 to feed those in need

Luxembourg is one of the wealthiest countries in the world, but the European Commission will provide € 390,000 to feed those in need

Today, many workers are looking to subsidized grocery stores where only those who can prove that their income is inadequate can shop.

Photo courtesy of: Matic Zorman

Despite being one of the wealthiest countries in the world, Brussels will provide € 390,000 to feed those who are struggling to achieve their goals.

The European Commission’s Fund for the Underprivileged (FEAD) program will distribute funds to help Luxembourg provide more food aid, the Commission said in a statement on Friday. rice field.

The funding will allow Luxembourg to address “higher needs and new demands” in access to food as a result of the pandemic, the Commission said.

The program aims to provide the poorest households across the EU with basic needs such as food, clothing and toiletries. The Commission has decided to allocate € 3.8 billion to the program between 2014 and 2020 and to expand the funding until 2022 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The receiving country must tip 15% in addition to the contribution of the Commission.

Last year, Luxembourg received € 460,000 as part of a program to provide essentials such as food and clothing to more and more people who have been unable to meet such basic needs since the start of the pandemic. I did.

According to data from the EU statistical agency Eurostat, the working poor in Luxembourg (which is approaching the poverty line despite working) has increased in recent years, with 12% of workers in 2020. Has reached. This is the highest rate for the entire block, second only to Romania.

The minimum wage in Luxembourg is the highest in the EU, at € 2,776 per month for skilled workers and € 2,313 for unskilled workers.

Many workers are looking to subsidized grocery stores where only those who can prove that their income is inadequate can shop. These shops first arrived in Luxembourg in 2009 in response to the financial crisis. They were popular during the pandemic and are once again popular due to rising prices.

People affected by the working poor are most suffering from rising housing costs. In 2019, more than one-third of tenants spent more than 40% of their income on rent and heating, according to the Luxembourg Institute of Social and Economic Research (LISER). According to the data, 20% of households with the lowest wages spend half of their income on housing.

Under the Commission’s program, national authorities can buy food and goods themselves and distribute them to those who need them, or give organizations money to buy them items.


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